Meet the Hullo design team

 

Meet the Hullo design team

As you know, Hullo Creative is a collective.

That means that although Suzi and Emily run the show between them, they are supported by a huge range of creative professionals. This month we’re talking to the design team so you can find out about more about all of us.


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Polly Wyer

Designer & illustrator

What’s your natural design style / specialism?
Graphic design and illustration. The briefs I take on tend to be quite varied because I find a range of different projects keeps my life interesting! I really enjoy the hands-on creativity I have with illustration but I love graphic design because I get to do a bit of creative problem solving.


What’s the project you’re proudest of?
That’s a tough one because my answer is always changing! Recently I worked on a project which involved creating lots of infographics from statistics. I was surprised by how much I enjoyed the challenge of translating the written data into something visual. Seeing the finished results and hearing the positive response from the client was really rewarding and I was genuinely proud of the outcome.

Where do you get your inspiration?
I find looking through Pinterest can help to get my mind working creatively. Failing that, taking myself for a walk to clear my head means I can get back to my desk with a fresh perspective.


Which brand would you absolutely love to work with?
I would love to work on a project for a music festival. Green Man always use amazing design and illustration in their branding so that would be the dream!


What would we be surprised to learn about you?
I like to eat peanut butter and marmite sandwiches. That’s right, mixed together. Don’t judge me.


What one thing can you not live without?
It would have to be dogs. I would stop traffic to pet a cute dog. I mean, I have done.


What’s the worst design crime, in your opinion?
An ugly font or a pixelated image is never a good look!


What’s your top design tip?
It always helps to start with a good, detailed brief. This usually means asking the client the right questions and listening to the answers.


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Emily Jones

digital and operations director

What’s your natural design style / specialism?
My favourite thing has to be being able to take a brand and visualising it digitally, showing how that works from website, to social and more. Giving people insight into a business through pictures, styles and everything visual.

What’s the project you’re proudest of?
It’s a hard one because there are so many I have really enjoyed but the most recent projects that I have really loved are the Sunlight Photography and Clean Bees websites. They both are incredible companies, but also great people and brands so it made it so much more enjoyable.

Where do you get your inspiration?
I like to take time out and go shopping, it sounds like a cop out but it’s actually where I feel most inspired, seeing how displays work in shops, the colours people have used and how it works together.

Which brand would you absolutely love to work with?
GoLive HQ - they are an incredible brand in America that specialise in Squarespace websites but are also a kick ass team of women who are absolutely taking over the digital world.

What would we be surprised to learn about you?
I didn’t always work in the digital world, before doing what I do now, I lived in South Africa as a professional hiphop dancer - crazy, I know.

What one thing can you not live without?
As cheesy as it sounds, it would have to be family. They are such a support but also a big inspiration. Coffee is a very close second on that list.

What’s the worst design crime, in your opinion?
Can I have two? Either having a gazillion different fonts on your website or putting the content on the pages all the way to edges of the page so it fills the entire screen meaning you have no white space. It just makes it so hard to ready anything and you are often left with a very flustered visitor to your site.

What’s your top design tip?
Leave white space, you don’t need to fill every inch of a page, allow space for your mind to digest a page and take in the valuable content.


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Max Randall

Graphic designer

What’s your natural design style / specialism?
I particularly love editorial design. I’m all about magazines.

What’s the project your proudest of?
I worked on designing some articles for cycling magazine Boneshaker for a while, which I loved. I've also been working on a big trade energy magazine with Hullo and have done eight issues a year, which I’m proud of just because of the size of the project, and getting 16 magazines designed. I also had the pleasure of working on some illustrated pages for a Bible last year - I worked on it with my wife (she's an illustrator); that was great fun!


Where do you get your inspiration?
Good sounding answer - when I go for a run. Annoying answer - Instagram! Both can work!

Which brand would you absolutely love to work with?
For me it would have to be a magazine, and a few of the best out there are New York Times Magazine, Eye and Mundial.

What would we be surprised to learn about you?
I have two different coloured eyes. Some people notice as soon as they see me, some good friends didn’t notice for years!

What one thing can you not live without?
Football.


What’s the worst design crime, in your opinion?
Hmm. Comic Sans, ha! Designing in Microsoft Word! But seriously, it’s probably overfilling anything, putting too much information on a page/flyer/business card etc. When something looks overcrowded, instead of communicating more information it has the opposite effect as I think people are overwhelmed with what to read and so don’t take in much of it at all.

What’s your top design tip?
Less is more. Cut down those words.


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Suzi Hull,

Creative lead

What’s your natural design style / specialism?
I think I’m most suited to branding and implementing that. When I was working in agency, I loved editorial and brochures and I still love that but I think I get most inspired when a new company comes to us and shares their passion and then we get to visualise what would represent that. I love then implementing that across their bits and bobs.

What’s the project you’re proudest of?
The most recent project I’m proud of is the book we did for Em Waring: ’Seasons of Sex & Intimacy’. We helped visualise a book she’s been writing for many years and helped her with the self publishing of it all, essentially acting as her publishing house.

We worked with a fab book editor and together did the cover, typesetting, website, illustrations, print management, marketing materials and celebrated this whole thing with a fabulous book launch in Brighton. It’s one we’re still working on so it’s fresh in my mind and I’m so proud of everything Em has done with and without us. Amazing.

Where do you get your inspiration?
From the clients themselves. People are incredible and I love taking them, hearing about their passions and visualising it. The best inspiration is the person behind the concept.

Which brand would you absolutely love to work with?
I love how Macmillans have captured a nation by branding up fundraising events and equipping people with a party kit to do it themselves. I’d love to do that for a smaller charity to equip them to do the same thing.

What would we be surprised to learn about you?
I love dunking salty chips in McFlurry ice creams.

What one thing can you not live without?
Tea. Not even a pause on that question. Thinking of getting a teacup tattoo as I love it so much… haha!

What’s the worst design crime, in your opinion?
Stretching images - hold down shift when you resize things, everyone!

What’s your top design tip?
If something doesn’t look right, don’t throw it away, it’s probably one tweak away from working. Also, if you like it, go with it. Design isn’t everything - it’s also subjective, it’s how confident you are in it half the time!


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Hayley Kyte

Graphic designer

What’s your natural design style / specialism?
Precise, neat, geometric, accurate. I’d say my specialism, and the thing I love doing, is taking something really complex and making it visually simple and easy to understand.

What’s the project you’re proudest of?
Easy: Pride! I’ve done voluntary work for the Bristol Pride Festival for the last four years. I design posters, programmes, stage banners, wristbands and signage. Seeing everything come together for the big event is incredible.

As well as being an important public festival, Pride’s a celebration of people being able to be whoever they want to be. I’m proud to be a part of it, and to contribute to the quality and unique character of Bristol’s own Pride Festival.

Where do you get your inspiration?
Inspiration can be just realising that today’s sky is the perfect shade of blue for the logo you’re working on. But that kind of lightbulb-moment magic doesn’t always happen. On those days, I go to Pinterest. I also like to sketch things out with a bit of classic pen and paper, it's easier to be freer and test ideas out by sketching rather than creating everything digitally.

Which brand would you absolutely love to work with?
When I was younger, I wanted to be an animator and work for Aardman. I’m very happy doing the design work I do now, but I’d still love to work in some capacity with Aardman someday.

Also, I’d love to design more books, so working with publishers, self-publishers and writers is something I’d like to do more of.


What would we be surprised to learn about you?
I drive a very small old car, but I’m aiming to save up and get a new Ford Mustang as my next car. I love American muscle cars.

What one thing can you not live without?
Music. I always have music on - in the morning, in the car, while working, walking anywhere, celebrating anything, before bed, and when I’m drifting off to sleep. I really couldn't live without it.

What’s the worst design crime, in your opinion?
Ultimate Design Crime: Microsoft Word. There’s a common misconception that Word can be substituted for design software. It is, however, utterly impossible to design anything in Word, or even to make anything look half as good as it could in virtually any other programme!


What’s your top design tip?
I had some good advice from another freelancer when I was first starting out: “Always do your best work”. This has steered me pretty well through my freelance career. If you always do your best work, you can always be proud of what you’ve created and what you’re putting out into the world.


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Dani Owens

Graphic designer

What’s your natural design style / specialism?
I have always worked in print but I have recently got more into the digital side which I love!

What’s the project you’re proudest of?
The most recent project that I’m proud of would probably be the Amazing Grains logo branding. I am fairly new to branding briefs and this was one of the first projects I worked on.

Where do you get your inspiration?
I love attending design talks at the Arnolfini in Bristol. It’s inspiring to hear how brands have developed and how different design strategies are used. I also love a good Pinterest board!

Which brand would you absolutely love to work with?
High end makeup brands such as benefit would be cool!

What would we be surprised to learn about you?
I have vivid dreams pretty much every night.

What one thing can you not live without?
Ketchup.

What’s the worst design crime, in your opinion?
Clashy colours and not being consistent.

What’s your top design tip?
Less = more!

 
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