What does your brand colour say about you?

 

Different colours evoke different emotions in us, making us feel a certain way.

They also allow us to assume things about the owner, or wearer, of the colour. For instance, if you see someone driving a bold bright red car, you’re likely to make different assumptions about them than if they were driving a sedate navy car, right?

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The same goes with brands. People will often subconsciously develop a first impression of you and your business based on the colours of your branding. So it’s important that some thought goes into what you want this impression to be.

What could these colours suggest about your brand?

There are no hard and fast rules, but in general you can find these trends emerging if you look around you at the brands you see every day.

Blue - You’re calm and dependable. IT companies and banks often choose blue as it says ‘you can trust us to deliver’. 

Green - A peaceful colour linked to health and growth. Unsurprisingly, businesses that are proud of their eco-credentials tend towards greens.

Pink - You’re creative and confident, with personality. An element of pink often creeps into colour palettes for strong female entrepreneurs.

Orange - A cheerful colour that can also give us a warning. A company working in the security industry might gravitate to this kind of colour.

Red - You’re confident and exciting (possibly aggressive!). Think Coca Cola, Nike and Virgin for stand-out companies that use red really effectively.

Grey - You’re solid and dependable. Often used as a secondary colour, grey is neutral and easy to use, but not as harsh as black. 

Of course there are different shades and tones of all colours, which will alter the way people perceive them. For example, pastels are often used when a brand has an element of spirituality or coaching. They represent a caring, welcoming nature.

How do you know which colours are right for your brand?

Making the right choice is really important and something that deserves some thought. In fact, a lot more goes into selecting a brand colour palette than many people realise. 

We often find where there is a single business owner, one predominant colour works well, while if it’s a partnership business, two strong colours suit. 

For example, the branding we did for Interpreting Pathways (below) blends a strong turquoise and purple to represent the two founder members of the business. 

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But, if you’re a sole trader, your brand is you. In that case, it’s about picking the colours that will accurately represent you. One easy place to find inspiration is in the clothes you wear. 

Take our client Rhian Sherrington from Women in Sustainability. The obvious colours for a brand of this nature were pink (feminine) and green (eco-friendly). But Rhian loves purple, turquoise and other bright shades. So we mixed it up to make it truly reflect Rhian herself, while also incorporating those key shades that help her audience to understand what her business stands for. We chose purple and grey as the main brand colours, but within a wider palette including bright green and strong pink.

The key is consistency. If a customer chooses you because they believe you are reliable, they should get this impression through all their interactions with you. If your branding screams ‘huge, wacky personality’, but you’re shy and retiring in person, they could end up feeling a bit confused. 

Branding is about building trust and understanding, which helps you attract the right clients for you (and keeps the wrong ones away).

Branding the Hullo way

Your brand colours should work hard for you, giving an insight into what you’re all about. By choosing the right ones, you’ll attract your target customers, while those that don’t fit with your ethos won’t be drawn in the same way.

We know it’s difficult; it’s a decision that you will probably have to stick with for the foreseeable future, so you want to get it right. But we believe you also need to love it. Since you’ll be looking at your branding more than anyone else, it absolutely has to work for you as well as your customers.

If you would like some support with branding for your business, get in touch to find out how we can help.

 
Suzi Hull